Learning English words with Cnn Student News: Topic 1 – Volcano

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1. Listening

At first, you should listen three to four times. Don’t care much if you can’t listen accurately or miss the words. Just to help you to be acquaintance with the pronunciation and intonation of the speaker.

After listening, take the script of this dialogue below, read out loud and slowly to remember how the word is pronounced and highlight as well look for the meaning of all the useful words includes collocations, idioms, phrasal.

When you understand the words, listen again around 1-2 times to figure out the content of dialogue

Why you have to learn listening skill first, please refer to this post: Big Secret for Mastering and Getting Fluent 4 English Skill Quickly

verbs

2. Reading

Great to see you watching as we kick off (start) a new week of CNN 10. Our season runs through Friday June 1st. So, we have three weeks left on air, starting today.

  • Kick off (phrasal verb): start
  • Run through (phrasal verb): to look at, examine, or deal with a set of things, especially quickly

And we start today with a by-the-numbers look at the dangerous situation on Hawaii`s big island. That`s where the notoriously active Kilauea volcano has been erupting again for about a week and a half now.

  • Notoriously(adv) /nəʊˈtɔː.ri.əs/: famous for something bad

The first number we have is almost 2,000. It`s how many residents have been evacuated since the volcano started this eruption. Dozens of homes have been destroyed by lava.

  • Evacuate (v) /ɪˈvæk.ju.eɪt/: to move people from a dangerous place to somewhere safe

Next, 12. That`s the distance in miles away from the crater that ash plumes could cover if an explosive eruption occurs. Scientists expect more of those in the days ahead and new lava flows are also possible.

  • Crater /ˈkreɪ.tər/: the round hole at the top of a volcano, or a hole in the ground similar to this
  • Ash(n) /æʃ/: the soft grey or black powder that is left after a substance

Two-point-nine million is the estimated cost in dollars that Hawaiian officials expect will be needed to protect residents affected by the eruption and that`s for the next 30 days. U.S. President Donald Trump declared a major disaster in Hawaii on Friday. What does that is free up federal money and resources to help those affected.

Eighteen is the number of fissures, cracks on the ground where lava is seeping or spewing out, all caused by this eruption. Some of the fissures are miles away from Kilauea`s crater itself.

  • Fissure (n)/ˈfɪʃ.ər/: a deep, narrow crack in rock or the earth
  • Seep(v) /siːp/: spread slowly out of a hole
  • Spew(v) /spjuː/: If something spews liquid or gas, or liquid or gas spews from something, it flows out in large amounts

And that last number here is 1924. That`s the year when the Kilauea Volcano last behaved like this, according to some scientists. It was active for about three weeks then, sending ash high into the air and blasting blocks, weighing as much as 14 tons.

Now for a scientific look at how this eruption is playing out beneath the surface.

  • Beneath(preposition) /bɪˈniːθ/: a lower position than someone or something
  • Play out (phrasal verb): it happens and develops

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

IVAN CABRERA, CNN METEOROLOGIST: This is the layout here of Leilani Estates. There`s the evacuation zone. There are the closed roads. The new fissures have impacted the eastern area. So, we`ll continue to monitor that, but this whole area, folks have been taken out of the way with good reason as you can imagine, as these things continue to pop out just every few hours, every day or so.

  • Folk(n) /fəʊk/: people, especially those of a particular group or type
  • Pop out (phrasal verb): suddenly come out, if words pop out, you say them suddenly without thinking about it first (example: I didn’t mean to say that – it just popped out.)

This is the lake, of course. This is the account (ph) that I`ve been showing you the last few days, noticing that as the lake drained its lava, it went underground and that`s the lava that`s coming up to the fissures. I think again, that`s going to be the main threat.

  • Drain(v) /dreɪn/: to let liquid flow away from something

Notice as this continues to go down over the last several days, and one of our last pictures here, we can`t see the lava anymore. That`s an infrared camera, so the red you`re seeing there, that`s basically just heat signature here.

  • Infrared(adj) /ˌɪn.frəˈred/: Infrared light is a type of light that feels warm but cannot be seen

So, as that lava drops into the crater and into the basically a water table, let`s talk about what could potentially happen as far as this explosive eruption here as we check in with our volcano. There`s the lava and again what happens is, you get these rocks that will continue to fall down and that will create a blockage. And I don`t have to tell you what happens with the kinds of temperatures we`re seeing in here. We`re talking about temperatures well into 1,500 to 2,000 Celsius, right?

  • Water table(n): the level below the Earth’s surface where water is found
  • Blockage (n) /ˈblɒk.ɪdʒ/: something that stops something else passing through
  • Well(n): a deep hole in the ground from which you can get water, oil, or gas

Those rocks blocking that passageway at some point are going to give and once that goes into the water tables as you see there, we`re going to have

  • Passageway(n) /ˈpæsɪdʒweɪ/: a long narrow area with walls on each side that leads from one room or place to another 

watch out — quite an explosion here.

But again, I`m really not too concerned about this. It`s going to be a spectacular eruption when it happens, but I think, Cyril, because they have evacuated people out of the way, these boulders would sometimes can be the size of a school bus are not going to be impacting many folks. This is going to be within a few meters of the crater here and before that happens, you must imagine people will be getting out of the way, and that`s why they
closed the National Volcano Park there in the big island.

  • Boulder(n) /ˈbəʊl.dər/: a very large rock

3. Vocabulary 

  1. Kick off (phrasal verb): start
  2. Run through (phrasal verb): to look at, examine, or deal with a set of things, especially quickly
  3. Notoriously(adv) /nəʊˈtɔː.ri.əs/: famous for something bad
  4. Evacuate (v) /ɪˈvæk.ju.eɪt/: to move people from a dangerous place to somewhere safe
  5. Crater /ˈkreɪ.tər/: the round hole at the top of a volcano, or a hole in the ground similar to this
  6. Ash(n) /æʃ/: the soft grey or black powder that is left after a substance
  7. Fissure (n)/ˈfɪʃ.ər/: a deep, narrow crack in rock or the earth
  8. Seep(v) /siːp/: spread slowly out of a hole
  9. Spew(v) /spjuː/: If something spews liquid or gas, or liquid or gas spews from something, it flows out in large amounts
  10. Beneath (preposition) /bɪˈniːθ/: a lower position than someone or something
  11. Play out (phrasal verb): it happens and develops:
  12. Folk(n) /fəʊk/: people, especially those of a particular group or type
  13. Pop out (phrasal verb): suddenly come out, if words pop out, you say them suddenly without thinking about it first (example: I didn’t mean to say that – it just popped out.)
  14. Drain(v) /dreɪn/: to let liquid flow away from something
  15. Infrared(adj) /ˌɪn.frəˈred/: Infrared light is a type of light that feels warm but cannot be seen
  16. Water table(n): the level below the Earth’s surface where water is found
  17. Blockage (n) /ˈblɒk.ɪdʒ/: something that stops something else passing through
  18. Well(n): a deep hole in the ground from which you can get water, oil, or gas
  19. Passageway(n) /ˈpæsɪdʒweɪ/: a long narrow area with walls on each side that leads from one room or place to another 
  20. Boulder(n) /ˈbəʊl.dər/: a very large rock

4. Listen Again

Souce: https://edition.cnn.com/cnn10

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